Service


My world is a place where people find hope.

When describing a pivotal moment in the life of Jesus with his disciples the Bible says that Jesus “showed them the full extent of his love” (John 13:1 NIV).

How did Jesus show the disciples just how far his love would go? By taking off his outer garment, wrapping a towel around his waist and going from disciple to disciple—washing their feet.

The ultimate demonstration of love is to serve.

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Setting aside our own agendas, in service we live out our commitment to the well being of others, often to our own discomfort. Life often deals a painful blow to our fellow citizens of this world. It may leave a community without clean water, a child without access to education or it may convince a mother who struggles to provide for her children that there are no good options. Every day the Spirit of God motivates people to act in selflessness and self sacrifice to change the world that others face from a place of hopelessness to one of hope. Seventh-day Adventists believe that the admonition to love God with all of your mind, heart and soul naturally leads to the commitment to loving your neighbor through acts of kindness and service. You are invited to discover some of the ways we try to change the world. More than that you are invited to join us and discover how God wants to change the world through you.

WORKERS

A message too good not to share

The Seventh-day Adventist Church has a presence in more than 200 countries. Its commitment includes satellite television and shortwave radio blanketing the globe, a huge publishing program, thousands of schools, a large network of hospitals and clinics, and hundreds of overseas workers.

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A message to share

Jesus said: “Go and make followers of all people in the world” (Matthew 28:19). Known as “the Great Commission,” these words motivate Seventh-day Adventists.

In 1874, John Nevins Andrews left for Europe as the first official Adventist worker. He organized a group of believers in Switzerland and helped start a publishing house.

Today the Seventh-day Adventist Church has a presence in more than 200 countries. Its commitment includes satellite television and shortwave radio blanketing the globe, a huge publishing program, thousands of schools, a large network of hospitals and clinics, and hundreds of workers. It also includes a worldwide humanitarian work through the Adventist Development and Relief Agency (ADRA) and Adventist Community Services (ACS).

Out reach work encompasses not only sharing the story of Jesus but relieving suffering. Jesus explained that when He returns He will say to His followers: “I was hungry, and you gave me food. I was thirsty, and you gave me something to drink. I was alone and away from home, and you invited me into your house. I was without clothes, and you gave me something to wear. I was sick, and you cared for me. I was in prison, and you visited me. . . . Anything you did for even the least of my people here, you also did for me” (Matthew 25:35-40).

Seventh-day Adventists generously support out reach work through their tithes and offerings. As the church’s mission website states: “As long as there is even one person who doesn’t know God’s love, we will still need workers.”

HUMANITARIAN WORK

A call to serve

Since the establishment of the Seventh-day Adventist Welfare Service (SAWS) in 1956, the Adventist Church has continually prioritized humanitarian aid and community development. Today, Adventist humanitarian work reaches into more than 120 countries and serves tens of millions of people every year.

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A call to serve

Since the establishment of the Seventh-day Adventist Welfare Service (SAWS) in 1956, the Adventist Church has continually prioritized humanitarian aid and community development.

Today, Adventist humanitarian work reaches into more than 120 countries and serves tens of millions of people every year. This priority springs from a deeply held belief in service. Throughout the Old Testament, God made provision for the poor and less fortunate living in Israel. In the New Testament, the writings of the apostle Paul show a Christian church that gave willingly and generously to support the needy among them. (Deuteronomy 15:1-11, 2 Corinthians 8:8-15)

Our world is full of wars, natural disasters, poverty and famines, and we are motivated to reach out to the suffering in the name of Jesus. Our faith inspires us to show Christ’s love to the world around us. Faith expressed by action may require sacrifice, but it is only by selflessly serving others that we become a true reflection of Christ.

Our active faith is expressed personally in daily service to those around us and corporately in humanitarian organizations such as the Adventist Development and Relief Agency (ADRA) and Adventist Community Services (ACS). For Adventists, it is not enough to acknowledge that poverty exists. We must live a life in which the grace God has given us flows on to others in the form of love, care and generosity. (Matthew 25:31-45)

RELIGIOUS LIBERTY

Freedom to believe

The Seventh-day Adventist church strongly believes in religious freedom for all people. A person’s conscience, not government, should dictate his or her choice to worship — or not.

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Freedom to believe The Seventh-day Adventist church strongly believes in religious freedom for all people. A person’s conscience, not government, should dictate his or her choice to worship—or not. We have advocated for these goals for more than 100 years, through our department of Public Affairs and Religious Liberty (PARL), to governments and religious and international organizations. This advocacy takes many forms—fighting against laws that would inhibit an individual’s religious freedoms, working to obtain the release of individuals imprisoned for religious reasons and supporting the rights of individuals fired from their jobs for following their conscience, to name a few. As the official voice of the Adventist Church on matters of religious freedom and human rights, PARL maintains offices in Washington, D.C. to allow for convenient access to the U.S. Congress; New York City, to liaise with the United Nations; and at the church’s world headquarters in Silver Spring, MD. PARL also sponsors the International Religious Liberty Association (IRLA) on behalf of the Adventist Church. IRLA is a non-sectarian organization supporting religious freedom around the world. The first organization of its kind, IRLA brings together representatives of many faiths—including Catholics, Baptists, Muslims, Jews, Mormons, Buddhists and others—to support religious liberty. PARL and IRLA promote this vital cooperation through conferences, religious liberty festivals and other events, collectively raising awareness and educating government officials around the world. This priority is vital to the Seventh-day Adventist Church. While we are a rapidly growing denomination around the world, the church often finds itself in the religious minority, and consequently, understands the importance of ensuring that all voices be allowed to speak. The Adventist Church believes that fighting religious oppression and defending an individual’s right to worship according to his or her conscience—regardless of that person’s religious affiliation—is in everyone’s best interest.